Airbrushing indoors no windows!?!??!

DarkSouljah

SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS
Hello all,

My hobby-room doesnt have any windows. So I've been air brushing in my garage. But every time.. I have to remove the cars..set up a folding table and what not..then take everything apart once done and move the cars and it's a pain in the ass. Is it safe to airbrush indoors? I use mostly Vallejo Model Air, Tamiya & Mr. Color. I do have a spray-booth which has a filter and fan...I also use airbrush cleaner every time I am done air brushing so unsure if those are safe to spray indoors. I have a respirator as well.

Thanks!
 

White Glove Models - Kalan

CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER
So first off, I'm not an expert, however, I do feel that it entirely depends on so many different factors.
That being said, for the majority of the paints we use for the hobby, as long as they aren't Lacquers, you can get away with painting inside. I do it all the time, and wear my respirator every time I do, but I am fortunate enough to have my paint booth vent out the window.
I have seen people use their booths and have them just run the filter straight into the room with no problems. You'll just have the smell linger for a very long time if you're not able to air out the room.
I would say, if you can close the door and leave the room when you're done, and give it plenty of time to air out, or if you have am air purifier, I let mine run constantly on high in the hobby room, then you should be good.
I just would be careful if spraying lacquer paints and if you're going to be doing a whole lot of painting with them, I'd definitely take that out to the garage.
That's my two cents anyway from my experience.
One thing that you might consider if possible, is to put a dryer vent into the exterior wall of the room, and hook up your exhaust fan to that. Then you would have at least a way to exhaust the fumes and get some kind of air exchange into the room.
I hope I was able to help in a small way, and trust you will get some better, and most likely smarter advice from our friends here in the community, and I wish you luck! This has been one of my biggest concerns still to this day, and so far I've not passed out or blown anything up. (knock on wood) šŸ¤£šŸ¤Ŗllap
Kalan
 

Dirkpitty289

LIEUTENANT
I work in my basement and don't have any ventilation and no garage. I primarily use acrylics which I cut with distilled water or windshield washer fluid. These are ok for indoor use but I still always use a respirator. If I have to use an aerosol or enamel (Priming or car body colors) I do it when there is no one home and of course use a respirator. or wait till the weather allows me to work outside
 

Spencer Wolfe

Administrator
Staff member
First off ... for you
=====================
With water based acrylics, like Vallejo ... your main concern is particulates. A tight fitting filter mask, either N95 or P95 is usually enough for this. A respirator is better.

With paints that use stronger, organic solvents, such as lacquer/cellulose thinners or enamel thinners, you have to worry about particulates and vapors. Mr. Color and Tamiya fall into this category. For those, you need an actual respirator, one with organic vapor cartridges and particulate filters. The cartridges usually contain an activated material like carbon that chemically absorbs the vapors, which the particulate filters won't do.
=====================


For the stuff around you
=====================
If you and those around you can deal with the vapors from lacquers or enamels until they dissapate, then most of the time it's not too big of a problem. You just need to make sure to not linger in them until the they dissipate and not work near any open flames or sparking to be safe.

You still could end up with a small amount of dust buildup on immovable surfaces over long periods in a non-ventilated space. No single filter will catch 100% of everything. But, I would think that if you set up a box fan and run it with the garage door open (either during nice weather or at least when you're packing things away) would be enough to push most residual stuff outside.
=====================

Another option is to use a bucket filter if you really have no other way to vent outside. Here's a commonly referenced set of plans to make one. You would need inline air flow to make it work effectively.

 

DarkSouljah

SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS
So first off, I'm not an expert, however, I do feel that it entirely depends on so many different factors.
That being said, for the majority of the paints we use for the hobby, as long as they aren't Lacquers, you can get away with painting inside. I do it all the time, and wear my respirator every time I do, but I am fortunate enough to have my paint booth vent out the window.
I have seen people use their booths and have them just run the filter straight into the room with no problems. You'll just have the smell linger for a very long time if you're not able to air out the room.
I would say, if you can close the door and leave the room when you're done, and give it plenty of time to air out, or if you have am air purifier, I let mine run constantly on high in the hobby room, then you should be good.
I just would be careful if spraying lacquer paints and if you're going to be doing a whole lot of painting with them, I'd definitely take that out to the garage.
That's my two cents anyway from my experience.
One thing that you might consider if possible, is to put a dryer vent into the exterior wall of the room, and hook up your exhaust fan to that. Then you would have at least a way to exhaust the fumes and get some kind of air exchange into the room.
I hope I was able to help in a small way, and trust you will get some better, and most likely smarter advice from our friends here in the community, and I wish you luck! This has been one of my biggest concerns still to this day, and so far I've not passed out or blown anything up. (knock on wood) šŸ¤£šŸ¤Ŗllap
Kalan
It definitely helped in more than a small way. Any advice and experience in this is very beneficial. So thanks for you input.
 

DarkSouljah

SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS
I work in my basement and don't have any ventilation and no garage. I primarily use acrylics which I cut with distilled water or windshield washer fluid. These are ok for indoor use but I still always use a respirator. If I have to use an aerosol or enamel (Priming or car body colors) I do it when there is no one home and of course use a respirator. or wait till the weather allows me to work outside
Windshield wiper fluid? Never heard of that technique. Thanks for your help!
 

DarkSouljah

SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS
First off ... for you
=====================
With water based acrylics, like Vallejo ... your main concern is particulates. A tight fitting filter mask, either N95 or P95 is usually enough for this. A respirator is better.

With paints that use stronger, organic solvents, such as lacquer/cellulose thinners or enamel thinners, you have to worry about particulates and vapors. Mr. Color and Tamiya fall into this category. For those, you need an actual respirator, one with organic vapor cartridges and particulate filters. The cartridges usually contain an activated material like carbon that chemically absorbs the vapors, which the particulate filters won't do.
=====================


For the stuff around you
=====================
If you and those around you can deal with the vapors from lacquers or enamels until they dissapate, then most of the time it's not too big of a problem. You just need to make sure to not linger in them until the they dissipate and not work near any open flames or sparking to be safe.

You still could end up with a small amount of dust buildup on immovable surfaces over long periods in a non-ventilated space. No single filter will catch 100% of everything. But, I would think that if you set up a box fan and run it with the garage door open (either during nice weather or at least when you're packing things away) would be enough to push most residual stuff outside.
=====================

Another option is to use a bucket filter if you really have no other way to vent outside. Here's a commonly referenced set of plans to make one. You would need inline air flow to make it work effectively.

Thanks for this. Lot's of things that I did not know. I also use lacquer thinner for using Tamiya's and what not so definitely a concern using indoors. This is the respirator that I have.


61sGXsJ82PL._AC_UX679_.jpg
 

DarkSouljah

SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS
Thanks for everyone's input. I truly do appreciate it. I purchased (2) 25 ft dryer vent tubes. So I'll just set those up and have it run to a window in the next room. I'll have to remove the tube every time I am done which is a pain but definitely better than setting up shop in my garage every time and I also no longer have to worry about fumes in my home when air brushing. So thanks again!
 

O2man65

RECRUIT
I'm in a similar situation.i made a filter using a 5 gallon bucket from lowes a 4 inch dryer vent tube and charcoal infused filter material .mount the tube in the bucket lid seal were tube goes through lid . cut 1 or 2 inch holes around upper portion of bucket line with filter material make sure to cover holes with filter. Put lid on connect to spray booth. It helps you will still have some oder especially with lacquer.
 
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